ESXi Configuration Restore fails with blank DCUI

Backing up and restoring an ESXi host configuration is a standard procedure that can be used when performing maintenance on the host. Not only host name, IP address and passwords are backed up, but also NIC and vSwitch configuration, Object ID and many other properties. Even after a complete reinstallation of a host, it can recover all the properties of the original installation.

Recently I wanted to reformat the bootdisk of a host in my homelab and had to fresh install ESXi for this. The reboot with the clean installation worked fine and the host got a new IP via DHCP.

Now the original configuration was to be restored via PowerCLI. To do this, first put the host into maintenance mode.

Set-VMhost -VMhost <Host-IP> -State "Maintenance"

Now the host configuration can be retored.

Set-VMHostFirmware -VMHost <Host-IP> -Restore -Sourcepath <Pfad_zum_Konfigfile>

The command prompts for a root login and then automatically reboots. At the end of the boot process, an empty DCUI was welcoming me.

I haven’t seen this before. I was able to log in (with the original password), but all network connections were gone. The management network configuration was also not available for selection (grayed out). The host was both blind and deaf.

Continue reading “ESXi Configuration Restore fails with blank DCUI”

vSAN File Service for SMB

One new feature of vSAN 7.0 update 1 is SMB support with vSAN File Service. Version 7.0 GA was limited to the NFS protocol.

Where’s the SMB option?

I was a little bit confused that I wasn’t able to choose SMB protocol for vSAN File Service after I’ve updated my homelab cluster to version 7 U1.

As always it’s a good idea to open your eyes and read the fine-print. Just below the dropdown menu there’s the unmistakable quote:

Enable active directory configuration in the File Service configuration before using SMB protocol.

Sounds logic and explains why I could not choose the SMB protocol. My homelab works without ADS. Instead a small bind9 server is responsible for DNS resolution.

You can find a hint in the properties of an existing file share too.

Long story short: No Active Directory – no SMB in vSAN File Service 🙂

Lockdown Book Project: vSphere 7 – The compendium

I had the special pleasure of working on a book project as co-author in the past months. It is entitled “VMware vSphere 7 – Das umfassende Handbuch” (“VMware vSphere 7 – The Compendium”, published in German language) and will be published in November by Rheinwerk-Verlag. It is the 6th updated and extended edition of this series.

This book covers a wide range of vSphere 7. From basic architecture to setup and day-2 operations. It helps novice and advanced IT administrators understand the principles of vSphere, network virtualization with NSX-T, vSAN, container workloads, VMware Cloud Foundation, Hybrid Cloud, and SDDC.

My contributions are the completely new written chapters Monitoring and vSAN. The chapter Monitoring is about giving the administrator an overview of the integrated monitoring tools and how to use and interpret them. It also introduces VMware and third-party tools. The vSAN chapter explains the fundamental structure of this storage virtualization and explains the special features of a vSAN cluster in comparison to conventional storage solutions.

It was a pleasure to work on this book with a team of experts.

vSAN Objects invalid

After a failed firmware update on my Intel x722 NICs one host came up without its 10 Gbit kernelports (vSAN Network). Every effort of recovery failed and I had to send in my “bricked” host to Supermicro. Normally this shouldn’t be a big issue in a 4-node cluster. But the fact that management interfaces were up and vSAN interfaces were not must have caused some “disturbance” on the cluster and all my VM objects were marked as “invalid” on the 3 remaining hosts.

I was busy on projects so I didn’t have much lab-time anyway, so I waited for the repair of the 4th host. Last week it finally arrived and I instantly assembled boot media, cache and capacity disks. I checked MAC addresses and settings on the repaired host and everything looked good. But after booting the reunited cluster still all objects were marked invalid.

Time for troubleshooting

First I opened SSH shells to each host. There’s a quick powerCLI one-liner to enable SSH throughout the cluster. Too bad I didn’t have a functional vCenter at that time, so I had to activate SSH on each host with the host client.

From the shell of the repaired host I’ve checked the vSAN-Network connection to all other vSAN kernel ports . The command below pings from interface vmk1 (vSAN) to IP 10.0.100.11 (vSAN kernel port of esx01 for example)

vmkping -I vmk1 10.0.100.11

I received ping responses from all hosts on all vSAN kernel ports. So I could conclude there’s no connection issue in the vSAN-network.

Continue reading “vSAN Objects invalid”